Aug 28

Arrest in Attempted Sexual Assault May Lead to More Victims

ball

Investigators with the Arapahoe County Sheriff’s Office believe there may be more victims of a man recently arrested for attempted sexual assault. On Thursday, Aug. 27, Deputies arrested 39-year-old Jeffrey Ball, of Denver, and booked him into the Arapahoe County Detention Facility on the following charges:

C.R.S. 18-3-402 C.R.S. 18-3-404 C.R.S. 18-7-302

Sexual Assault (Attempted), a class 5 Felony (No Bond) Unlawful Sexual Contact (Attempted), a class 2 Misdemeanor Indecent Exposure, a class 1 Misdemeanor

In this case, the 20-year-old victim reported that a man came into her place of business in the 9200 block of East Mineral Avenue on Thursday, August 13, 2015. She told investigators that he introduced himself and left, but returned a short time later stating that his car needed a jump start. The victim agreed to help and drove him in her car to a covered parking garage a few blocks away. The victim reported that the man then exposed himself and attempted to get the victim to perform sexual acts. The victim immediately drove back to her work where the man got out of her car.

Working with the description and surveillance video, investigators identified the man as Ball and discovered he works in the same area as the victim.

Given the nature of the offense and how it was carried out, investigators believe there may be other victims. Anyone with additional information is asked to contact Investigator Turnidge at

Aug 28

Colorado Creative Industries Community-Based Music Touring Program

    

Flobots to help launch innovative program that connects Colorado 

musicians with statewide communities

 

Denver — Colorado Creative Industries (CCI today announced the launch of a new program called Detour, a statewide pilot that creates a model of music touring as a community-based, sustainable and creatively rewarding practice. A new component of CCI’s music strategy, Detour will join Colorado musicians and bands with towns from throughout the state in programming performances, residencies, workshops, collaborations, field recordings and community celebrations.

 

Detour will develop a sustainable touring model for musicians that connect communities through song-sharing and engagement. The effort is led by CCI with partners including Altitude Digital, Denver Arts & Venues, 2MX2, Huckleberry Roasters, SpokesBUZZ, History Colorado, Songbird Cellars and United Interests. CCI will contribute $11,000 to the initial pilot, and an additional $20,000 will be leveraged through show revenues and local area support.

 

“Detour will enhance traditional touring models and promote access to high quality talent through collaborative engagement events,” said Margaret Hunt, executive director of CCI. This concept will shift music-making from an emphasis on consumption to cooperative creation.”

 

Fifteen communities have committed to the pilot program: Beulah, Cortez, Denver, Durango, Fort Garland, Fort Morgan, Ignacio, Joes, Rangely, Pueblo, San Luis, Sterling, Telluride, Towaoc and Trinidad. These were selected based on variety of geographic locations, commitment of local resources and community involvement. Selection criteria will be developed for Colorado bands and communities beginning in 2016.

 

The inaugural Detour will launch on Sept. 2, 2015 in Pueblo, featuring the internationally renowned and regionally revered rock and hip hop band the Flobots. In 2007, the band founded Flobots.org, now Youth On Record, an organization dedicated to empowering young people through creative education.

 

“Playing big festival shows is always a thrill, but there’s something truly special about the intimacy of a small venue,” said Jonny 5, one of Flobots lead vocalists. “It’s even more special if you can find ways to meet people beforehand; to know the stories behind the faces and then watch those faces react to the show – that is the ultimate gift.”

 

Most events are free with a limited number of ticketed shows. For more information and a schedule of events, please visit coloradocreativeindustries.org .

 

Aug 27

Summer Ozone Program

For an AQI value that considers all pollutants, please click here .

Ground-level ozone is a summertime air pollution problem that is created when other pollutants from sources like vehicle exhaust, paints, degreasing agents and cleaning fluids react with sunlight. Exposure to ground-level ozone can cause acute respiratory problems, reduced lung capacity and inflammation of lung tissues and can trigger asthma attacks.

Ground-level ozone should not be confused with the protective stratospheric ozone layer miles above the Earth’s surface. This naturally-occurring ozone layer protects the Earth’s surface from excessive ultra-violet radiation.

Do your share and be a part of the solution to the Denver-metropolitan area’s summertime air pollution problems. These easy strategies will help reduce the harmful vapors that react in sunlight to create summertime air pollution:

At Home:

Tightly cap all solvents (paint thinners and strippers, degreasers, and some cleaning products). Solvents contain pollution-causing vapors. Postpone painting, stripping and refinishing projects to avoid the morning and mid-day summertime heat. Better yet, wait until the Fall or Spring. Use water-based products (paints, stains and sealants).

In the Yard:

Delay mowing your lawn to another day. Don’t mow, let it grow! Avoid using high-emitting, gasoline-powered yard equipment. Electric alternatives are an efficient, environmentally-friendly alternative. Use an electric starter or a “charcoal chimney” to start your barbeque grill. Lighter fluid contains a lot of harmful vapors that escape into our air and contribute to summertime air pollution.

On the Go:

Stop at the click when refueling your car. Overfilling your tank often results in fuel spills and always allows unnecessary pollution-causing vapors to escape into our air. Refuel in the evenings after dusk. By refueling after the sun goes down, fuel vapors do not have as much of a chance to “cook” in the mid-day sun and become harmful ground-level ozone. Maintain your vehicle. A poorly-maintained vehicle can pollute as much as 25 times more than a well-maintained one.

To learn more about the summer ozone program, visit:
http://www.ozoneaware.org

Additional Information

ACTION DAYS: An Action Day for fine particulate matter (particulates), carbon monoxide, ozone or other pollutants indicates that either current air quality is unhealthy or conditions are expected to worsen later in the day or on the next day. Action Days for air pollutants generally indicate that air quality will be in either the Unhealthy or Unhealthy-for-Sensitive-Groups categories according to the Air Quality Index. Action Days trigger voluntary pollution prevention measures, which may vary by season, and public health recommendations. In addition, during the winter ‘high pollution day’ season (October 31 to March 31), Action Days trigger mandatory restrictions that limit burning inside the home to approved devices only (see indoor burning below).

Action Days for Visibility alone are issued during the winter ‘high pollution day’ season (October 31 to March 31), only. At the time they are issued (4 PM), action days for visibility indicate that the Visibility Standard Index for visual air quality is expected to be poor on the following day. Action Days for Visibility trigger mandatory restrictions that limit indoor burning to approved devices only and voluntary driving reductions for the seven-county Denver-Boulder metropolitan area (see indoor burning below).

The VISIBILITY STANDARD INDEX reports the air’s visual quality in the seven-county Denver-Boulder metropolitan area. The visibility standard is 0.076 per kilometer of atmospheric extinction, which means that 7.6 percent of the light in a kilometer of air is blocked. The level must exceed the standard based on a four-hour average for a violation to occur. On the Visibility Standard Index Scale, a value of 101 equates to the 0.076/km standard. Values between 0-50 are good, 51-100 moderate, 101-200 poor and 201-plus extremely poor.

The AIR QUALITY INDEX reports the daily level of air pollution on an hourly basis. The index reports the highest level of either carbon monoxide, fine particulates or ozone depending on which pollutant has the greatest hourly concentration. Values greater than 100 for carbon monoxide, fine particulates and ozone indicate exceedances of the pollutant’s state and federal standards. Air Quality Index values between 0-50 are good, 51-100 moderate, 101-150 unhealthy for sensitive groups, 151-200 unhealthy, 201-300 very unhealthy, and over 300 hazardous.

INDOOR BURNING: On Action Days issued during the winter ‘high pollution day’ season (October 31 through March 31), mandatory restrictions that limit indoor burning to approved devices only generally apply to everyone in the entire seven-county Denver-Boulder metropolitan area below 7,000 feet. The restrictions will be enforced through local ordinances or a state regulation.

The state regulation applies to any community in the seven-county Denver-Boulder metropolitan area that did not have its own mandatory indoor burning ordinance in effect on January 1, 1990. Under this regulation, the only exceptions to the burning restrictions are for residences above 7,000 feet in the seven-county Denver-Boulder metropolitan area; and those who use Colorado Phase III (Phase II EPA) certified woodburning stoves, Colorado approved pellet stoves, approved masonry heaters or those whose stoves or fireplaces are their primary source of heat. For more information on indoor burning, call the Air Pollution Control Division at (303) 692-3100.
For more, go to: http://www.cdphe.state.co.us/ap/woodhome.html

COLORADO OPEN BURN FORECAST: For those with permits for Open Burning, that is burning of waste materials or vegetation outside, check the following webpage to find out if open burning is allowed today:
http://www.colorado.gov/airquality/burn_forecast.aspx

FOR CURRENT AIR QUALITY INFORMATION AND UPDATES: 
http://www.colorado.gov/airquality/advisory.aspx
http://www.colorado.gov/airquality/air_quality.aspx

ABOUT THE AIR QUALITY INDEX: 
http://www.epa.gov/airnow/aqi_brochure_08-09.pdf

SOCIAL MEDIA AND AIR QUALITY NOTIFICATIONS: 
http://www.facebook.com/cdphe.apcd
http://twitter.com/#!/cdpheapcd
http://www.enviroflash.info/signup.cfm

Aug 27

No Ozone Action Day Alert in Effect

This is the Front Range Air Pollution Forecast effective 4 PM on Thursday, August 27, 2015:

No Advisories for Ozone or any other pollutant are in effect until at least 4 p.m. on Friday for the Front Range Urban Corridor from El Paso County north to Larimer and Weld counties, including the Denver-Boulder area, Colorado Springs, Fort Collins and Greeley.

Periods of gusty north to northwesterly winds will keep ozone concentrations in the Good to Moderate range through Friday afternoon.

Should atmospheric conditions suggest increased ground-level ozone concentrations, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and the Regional Air Quality Council will issue an ozone advisory. In addition, if conditions warrant, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment will issue advisories for other pollutants. Check this website (http://colorado.gov/airquality/advisory.aspx) often for a report on current air quality conditions and to learn if an ozone action day alert is in effect.

For statewide conditions, forecasts and advisories, visit:
http://www.colorado.gov/airquality/colorado_summary.aspx 

The highest Ozone related AQI at 1 o’clock PM Mountain Standard Time on August 27, 2015, is 42 which indicates Good ozone air quality. It was recorded by the AURE ambient ozone monitor.

The highest Particulate Matter (PM2.5) related AQI at 1 o’clock PM Mountain Standard Time on August 27, 2015, is 51 which indicates Moderate Particulate Matter (PM2.5) air quality. It was recorded by the LNGM ambient monitor. Respiratory symptoms possible in unusually sensitive individuals, possible aggravation of heart or lung disease in people with cardiopulmonary disease and older adults. Unusually sensitive people should consider reducing prolonged or heavy exertion.

Aug 27

Front Range Air Quality Forecast & Colorado Smoke Outlook

FRONT RANGE AIR QUALITY FORECAST: 

Thursday, August 27, 2015, 2:15 PM 

Ozone concentrations are expected to be in the Good category on Thursday and the Good to Moderate range on Friday. Moderate concentrations of ozone are most likely for locations in and near the Denver metro area. Unusually sensitive people should consider reducing prolonged or heavy outdoor exertion in those areas on Friday from 2 PM until 10 PM.

Fine Particulate Matter concentrations are expected to be in the Good category on Thursday and Friday.

Carbon Monoxide concentrations are expected to be in the Good category on Thursday and Friday.

Nitrogen Dioxide concentrations are expected to be in the Good category on Thursday and Friday.

Visibility is expected to be Good on Friday.

 

Aug 27

Winter High Pollution Advisory Program

The Winter High Pollution Advisory Program is coordinated by the Air Pollution Control Division of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

Winter season air pollution forecasts are issued daily from October 31 through March 31 at 4 p.m. When conditions warrant, forecasts will include information about Action Days and subsequent indoor burning restrictions.

An Action Day for fine particulates, carbon monoxide or ozone indicates that either current air quality is unhealthy or conditions are expected to worsen later in the day or on the next day. Action Days for air pollutants generally indicate that air quality will be in either the Unhealthy or Unhealthy-for-Sensitive-Groups categories according to the Air Quality Index. Action Days trigger mandatory restrictions that limit indoor burning to approved devices only (see indoor burning below), voluntary driving reductions, and public health recommendations.

An Action Day for Visibility alone indicates that the Visibility Standard Index for visual air quality is expected to be poor on the current or following day. An Action Day for Visibility will trigger mandatory restrictions on indoor burning and voluntary driving reductions for the seven-county Denver-Boulder metropolitan area only (see indoor burning below).

When no advisories are issued, air quality is good or moderate and is expected to remain so during the effective period of the forecast. No restrictions are in place.

Aug 27

Missing Endangered Adult

The Adams County Sheriff’s Office needs your help locating the following individual:

Theresa Ramirez a 54 year old Hispanic female, 5’00”, 150 lbs., short black hair, and brown eyes Theresa was last seen wearing black sweat pants and a black and white shirt.

Theresa was reported missing from her residence at 243 West 80th Avenue, in unincorporated Adams County by her family early this morning. Theresa was last seen around 2200 hours on 08/25/15. Theresa is believed to be traveling on foot, and does not have any forms of identification with her.

Theresa is known to display symptoms of dementia, and may be confused. If found, please contact the Adams County Sheriff’s Office dispatch center at 303-288-1535 or the nearest law enforcement agency.Missing Person

Aug 27

Grants for minority/women-owned CO businesses interested in exporting

DENVER – Weds., Aug. 26, 2015 – The Minority Business Office announced today a new round of export grants available to minority and women-owned small and medium-sized businesses in Colorado. Grants of up to $10,000 are available to companies that are new to exporting or are expanding into new export markets.

 

The export grants encourage small and medium-sized Colorado businesses to develop a strategic plan for export markets. Grants may be used for international business development and marketing projects including client development, airfare and lodging to a foreign market, foreign trade show exhibition and conference costs, trade missions, foreign business-to-business matchmaking services, and targeted advertising in overseas industry trade publications.

 

Businesses interested in applying for a grant are required to attend the Leading Edge for International Opportunities class curriculum. This ten-session course provides practical training for small businesses on all aspects of international trade, and is a partnership between the Colorado SBDC, the Rocky Mountain World Trade Center Institute, the Office of International Trade at OEDIT, and the Colorado Minority Business Office. The course is available in-person or via recorded webinar and will instruct attendees on the nuts and bolts of international trade and business transactions. Completion of the course will provide participant businesses with certification to the NASBITE Certified Global Business Professional (CGBP) as part of the grant and World Trade Center of Denver annual membership and WTC Annual Meeting on Sept. 22, 2015. The value to attendees for the classes, WTC membership, and NASBITE certification will be covered by the Colorado SBDC.

 

The deadline for grant applications is Oct. 1, 2015. Late acceptance will be approved based on individual exceptions. To find out if your business is eligible and to apply, please visit http://www.advancecolorado.com/business-colorado/minority-businesses.

Aug 26

Sickweather Alert: Denver Illnesses Going Around 8/26/15 – 9/2/15

BALTIMORE, MD – August 26, 2015 – This is the weekly forecast for your area.

Allergies, Cough, and Common Cold are going around in Denver.  Reports of Cough are on the rise (see attached graph).

Here’s the link to the Animated 5-Day Denver map: http://sick.io/xl57e

Sickweather Forecast & Maps explained: Sickweather uses a patent-pending process to track and map reports of illness on Twitter and Facebook. The forecast represents the top trending illnesses reported in any given area. The maps show clusters of activity as represented by a heat map, or individual reports as represented by blue “SICK” map markers. 

Aug 26

Colorado has been ranked the #16 most “Dog Happy” U.S. state.

Colorado has been ranked the #16 most “Dog Happy” U.S. state, according to the Milo’s Kitchen ‘Dog Happy’ Survey.

To create this national doggy appreciation ranking, Milo’s Kitchen brand dog treats surveyed 3,000 dog parents to determine how regularly they engage in thankful, grateful, and loving behaviors with their dogs (such as buying regular gifts for their dog, petting their dog, and telling their dog “I Love You”).

 

*** MILO’S KITCHEN ‘DOG HAPPY’ SURVEY RESULTS ***

“THE TOP 25 MOST ‘DOG HAPPY’ U.S. STATES”

(states that appreciate and spend time with their dogs the most)

 

  1. California
  2. New York
  3. Washington
  4. Tennessee
  5. Florida
  6. Massachusetts
  7. Texas
  8. Missouri
  9. Ohio
  10. Arizona
  11. Pennsylvania
  12. Michigan
  13. New Hampshire
  14. Kentucky
  15. Montana
  16. Colorado
  17. Louisiana
  18. North Dakota
  19. Illinois
  20. Delaware
  21. Kansas
  22. Wisconsin
  23. Alabama
  24. Virginia
  25. Arkansas

 

For more details on the “Milo’s Kitchen ‘Dog Happy’ Survey,” please visit this link:

http://mktreattruck.com/2015/08/25/milos-kitchen-dog-happy-survey/

 

*** ADDITIONAL FINDINGS ***

 

* 86% of dog parents say their dog “comforts them immeasurably”

* 71% say their dog “reminds them to seek out more joy in life”

* 64% say their dog “makes them look forward to going home more than anything else”

* 63% say their dogs “make them much more patient and responsible”

 

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