Colorado Parks & Wildlife officers confirm latest wolf pack sighting in NW Colorado

MOFFAT COUNTY – Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) officials are confirming they have additional evidence that a group of wolves is now residing in northwest Colorado.

On Jan. 19, CPW wildlife officers investigated the discovery of an animal carcass surrounded by large wolf-like tracks in the northwest corner of Moffat County. While conducting their investigation in the field, wildlife officers were surprised when they heard distinct howls within the area.

“This is a historic sighting. While lone wolves have visited our state periodically including last fall, this is very likely the first pack to call our state home since the 1930s. I am honored to welcome our canine friends back to Colorado after their long absence,” said Governor Jared Polis. “It’s important that Coloradans understand that the gray wolf is under the protection of the Endangered Species Act. While the animals have naturally migrated to our state and their presence draws public interest, it’s important that people give them space. Due to their Protected status, there are severe federal penalties for anyone that intentionally harms or kills wolves in our state.”

“Right after our two officers heard the howls from the wolves, they used binoculars to observe approximately six wolves about two miles from the location of the carcass,” said JT Romatzke, Northwest Region Manager for CPW. “After watching them for about 20 minutes, the officers rode in to get a closer look. The wolves were gone but they found plenty of large tracks in the area.”

A trail of wolf tracks observed by Colorado Parks and Wildlife officers in
Northwest Colorado on January 19, 2020

According to the officers, the tracks measured approximately 4.5 to 5.5 inches and appear to have been made by at least six animals.

“As we have made clear, Colorado Parks and Wildlife will not take direct action in these cases,” said Dan Prenzlow, Director of Colorado Parks and Wildlife. “We have the leading experts on wildlife management and species recovery working for our agency, but while wolves remain federally protected, they are under the jurisdiction of the US Fish and Wildlife Service. We will continue to work with our federal partners and monitor the situation.”

According to the US Fish and Wildlife Service, killing a wolf can result in federal charges, including a $100,000 fine and a year in prison, per offense. The public is urged to contact CPW immediately and fill out a report if they see or hear wolves or find evidence of any wolf activity in Colorado. The Wolf Sighting Form can be found on the CPW website.

 

SPREAD THE NEWS

COMMENT, Like, Follow & SHARE @I70Scout

CURRENT EDITION

WEATHER & TRAFFIC    PUZZLES    RECENT NEWS    ADVERTISE WITH US

 






Related News

  • Colorado Parks and Wildlife enters next phase of ‘Live Life Outside’ campaign with ‘Conservation Starts Small’
  • Whirling Disease resistant rainbow trout now a reality in Colorado
  • Forests bouncing back from beetles, but elk and deer slowing recovery
  • Colorado lakes, reservoirs remain free of invasive mussels; but more boats found with mussel infestations in 2019
  • Feeding big-game wildlife is selfish and illegal
  • 2020 Ogallala Aquifer Summit will take place March 31-April 1 in Amarillo, Texas
  • Aerial Survey: Though Declining, Spruce Beetle Remains Top Priority for State and Federal Agencies
  • Bennet Criticizes Trump Administration’s Lack of Seriousness to Secure U.S. Leadership in Artificial Intelligence
  • Join The Conversation...

    %d bloggers like this: